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Posts published in “Psychology”

How to Close Out the Match When Up

How to Close Out the Match When Up | Sports Psychology for Tennis Video Mental Coaching from Anywhere in the World – LEARN MORE!Close…

A Q&A with Oliver Caviglioli and David Goodwin, authors of ‘Organise Ideas’


The role of graphics in education has changed – it has become more important than ever before.

We at InnerDrive loved Organise Ideas: Thinking by Hand, Extending the Mind, and you can read why in our full review. The book explains in great detail how choosing and designing the right word diagrams can affect how much information students understand and remember, but we still had a few questions.

We were lucky to have the opportunity to ask them to authors Oliver Caviglioli and David Goodwin. In this Q&A, we learn about what motivated them to write this book, concepts and ideas that they refer to, and advice for teachers about using word diagrams…

 

Rebound by Carrie Cheadle and Cindy Kuzma

Rebound: Training Your Mind to Bounce Back Stronger from Sports Injuries by Carrie Cheadle and Cindy Kuzma is a book that all athletes can greatly benefit…

Playing One Point at a Time

Playing One Point at a Time | Sports Psychology for Tennis Video Mental Coaching from Anywhere in the World – LEARN MORE!Close Top Banner…

How helpful are learning objectives?


By the end of the lesson, you will be able to…

These 11 words often come up at the start of a lesson, setting out the learning objectives for students. But are they actually helpful, or just a waste of your lesson time?

Well, let’s have a look at what the research suggests, and what the best ways to use them in your classroom are…

 

4 tips from research to support your teenager


Teenagers can be difficult to understand. They are socially and psychologically very different to children and adults. Teenagers are heavily influenced by peer pressure, need more sleep, often have low self-esteem, and need more exercise.

These tendencies can make teenagers seem lazy or irresponsible, when in reality, their brain structure, social hierarchies, and hormones are all highly accountable for these behaviours.

So, how does research explain why teenagers are different? And how you support your teenage child to make the best decisions?